Contact Lenses

Give them a try!

Wearing contact lenses is something that almost every spectacle wearer should try, even just to see what it is like. Contact lens materials are continually improving with changes in technology, resulting in greater comfort and clearer vision. With so many types of contact lenses available, ask your optometrist if contact lenses would be an option for you.

Lifestyle benefits

Convenience and freedom from glasses are the most obvious advantages of contact lens wear. Without a spectacle frame sitting on your nose you can almost forget you’re wearing a correction – except you can see! Other advantages of contact lenses include:

  • Better peripheral or side vision
  • No fogging up with rain or humidity
  • You can wear ‘normal’ sunglasses
  • Often better for playing sport (when eye protection isn’t needed)

Contact lenses can be worn full-time or part-time. Often once people start wearing contact lenses they find they hardly want to wear glasses any more. Other people are content to use contacts for specific occasions. The only way to find out is to give them a try!

Contact lens examinations

A new contact lens wearer will need a few tests to get their first pair of contact lenses.

  • general eye health check
  • contact lens fitting
  • teaching to put in and take out
  • aftercare test

Some of these tests may not be covered by Medicare, depending on your prescription.

We have a full range of disposable lenses available to order in. We also have a large range of trial lenses for the following contact lens brands:

  • Johnson and Johnson
  • Ciba
  • Cooper Vision
  • Bausch and Lomb 

Contact Lens Options

Soft Contact Lenses

Soft contact lenses are the type of lens prescribed to the vast majority of contact lens wearers. However rigid contact lenses are a good solution for particular kinds of eye conditions.

Soft lenses are made from hydrogel and silicone hydrogel – materials which contain water and allow oxygen to get through to the front of the eye. These flexible lenses are initially more comfortable than the rigid lenses and wrap on the front of the eye, only moving slightly with blinking.

Rigid Contact Lenses

Rigid lenses are smaller and more durable. There is a layer of tears between the lens and the eye enabling oxygen to get through to the cornea. RGP (rigid gas permeable) lenses are the lens of choice for keratoconus and orthokeratology.

Rigid contact lenses generally last for one to two years before needing replacement. These are soaked in disinfecting solution between wears.

Disposable Contact Lenses

Soft lenses prescribed now are disposable, meaning they have a certain number of wears before they need to be thrown out. The wearing times differ from one day up to three months. The most suitable type of lens will be chosen after many things have been taken into account, such as frequency of wear, the health of the cornea, convenience, cost and what the lenses will be worn for.

Generally there are three types of wearing schedule: 

Daily Disposable Lenses

These lenses are worn once only. They are removed from the eyes and then thrown out straight away. A new pair of lenses will be put in for the next wear.

Daily Wear Lenses

These lenses are removed at the end of the day and soaked in a disinfecting solution until the next time they are worn. The contact lens wearer needs to keep track of how many times the lenses have been worn. When this time has been reached, the lenses are thrown out and a new pair started.

Extended Wear Lenses

In some cases, where recommended by the optometrist, contact lenses can be left in overnight. Extended wear contact lenses provide a lot of flexibility and convenience and can be worn for 29 nights before being removed but this type of lens this will not be suitable for everyone.

Disposable lenses will now fit everyone, with custom-made lenses available for those people with eyes slightly different from the norm.